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Course Policies:
The following link is intended for the IUPUI campus only. Other campuses please check with your campus registrar.
http://registrar.iupui.edu/course_policies.html

Core Courses

L100 Survey of Unions and Collective Bargaining (3 cr.) This course includes coverage of historical development, labor law basics, and contemporary issues.  It also discusses a survey of labor unions in the United States; focusing on their organization and their representational, economic, and political activities.

L101 American Labor History (3 cr.) This course explores the struggles of working people to achieve dignity and security from social, economic, and political perspectives.  It also explores a survey of the origin and development of unions and the labor movement from colonial times to the present. 

L104 Introduction to the Study of Labor History (3cr.) This course serves as an orientation for the study of labor history.  It explores both critical and historical methodologies based on primary and secondary sources, biases, and interpretations.  Discussions focus on selective questions and events.  

L110 Introduction to Labor Studies: Labor and Society (3 cr.) This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary and advocacy approach of labor studies.  Exploring labor’s role in society, the class will look at how unions have changed the lives of working people and contributed to better social policies.  Discussions will highlight the relationship of our work lives to our non-work lives and will look at U.S. labor relations in a comparative framework.

L190 The Labor Studies Degree (1 cr.) Required for all Labor Studies program majors.  This course provides an introduction to the Labor Studies degree and to the knowledge and skills needed by students to progress toward a degree in a reasonable time frame.  Students will learn how to build a plan of study that takes advantage of both credit for prior learning and new learning opportunities.

L200 Survey of Employment Law (3 cr.) This course explores statutes and common-law actions protecting income, working conditions, and rights of workers.  Topics include workers’ compensation, unemployment compensation, fair labor standards, Social Security, retirement income protection, and privacy and other rights.

L201 Labor Law (3 cr.) This course reviews a survey of the law governing labor-management relations.  Topics include the legal framework of collective bargaining, problems in the administration and enforcement of agreements, and protection of individual employee rights.

L203 Labor and the Political System (3 cr.) This course examines federal, state, and local governmental effects on workers, unions, and labor-management relations; political goals; influences on union choices of strategies and modes of political participation, past and present; relationships with community and other groups.

L205 Contemporary Labor Problems (3 cr.) This course examines some of the major problems confronting society, workers, and the labor movement.  Topics may include automation, unemployment, international trade, environmental problems, minority and women’s rights, community relations, and changing government policies.

L210 Workplace Discrimination and Fair Employment (3 cr.) This course examines policies and practices that contribute to workplace discrimination and those designed to eliminate it.  It explores effects of job discrimination and occupational segregation.  It analyzes Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and related topics in relation to broader strategies for addressing discrimination.

L220 Grievance Representation (3 cr.) This course looks at union representation in the workplace.  It evaluates uses of grievance procedures to address problems and administer the collective bargaining agreement. It also explores analyses of relevant labor law and the logic applied by arbitrators to grievance decisions. Students learn about the identification, research, presentation, and writing of grievance cases.

L230 Labor and the Economy (3 cr.) This course analyses aspects of the political economy of labor and the role of organized labor within it.  It emphases the effect on workers, unions, collective bargaining of unemployment, investment policy, changes in technology and corporate structure.  It also explores patterns of union political and bargaining responses.

L231 Globalization and Labor (3 cr.) This course explores the globalization of trade, production, and migration and the effects of these processes on American workers. Through reading, discussion, and problem formation, students will critically think about the ways global processes and policies impact American workers’ daily lives, analyze existing historical and current justifications for offshore production and the dismantling of barriers to trade and investment, and explore alternatives to these policies. 

L240 Occupational Health and Safety (3 cr.) This course reviews elements and issues of occupational health and safety.  It emphases the union’s role in the implementation of workplace health and safety programs, worker and union rights, hazard recognition techniques, and negotiated and statutory remedies—in particular the OSHA Act of 1970.

L250 Collective Bargaining (3 cr.) This course emphasizes development and organization of collective bargaining in the United States, including union preparation for negotiations; bargaining patterns and practices; strategy and tactics; economic and legal considerations.

L251 Collective Bargaining Laboratory (1-3 cr.) This course provides collective bargaining simulations and other participatory experiences in conjunction with L250.  L250 is either a prerequisite or a core requisite.

L255 Unions in State and Local Government (3 cr.) This course explores union organization and representation of state and municipal government employees, including patterns in union structure, collective bargaining, grievance representation, and applicable law.

L260 Leadership and Representation (3 cr.) This course evaluates organizational leadership issues for union, community, and other advocate organizations.  It analyzes leadership styles, membership recruitment, and leadership development.  It examines the role of leaders in internal governance and external affairs, including committee building, delegation, negotiations, and coalition building.

L270 Union Government and Organization (3 cr.) This course provides an analysis of the growth, composition, structure, behavior, and governmental processes of U.S. labor organizations, from the local to the national federation level.  It considers the influence on unions of industrial and political environments; to organizational behavior in different types of unions; and to problems in union democracy.

L280 Union Organizing (3 cr.) This course explores various approaches and problems in private- and public-sector organizing.  Traditional approaches are evaluated in light of structural changes in labor markets and workforce demographics.  Topics range from targeting and assessments to committee building and leadership development.

L285 Assessment Project (1 cr.) This is a capstone experience for associate degree students.

Other Courses

L199 Portfolio Development Workshop (1 cr.) Emphasis for this course is placed on developing learning portfolios as foundation documents for academic self-assessment and planning and as applications for self-acquired competency (SAC) credit.  This course applies only as elective credit to labor studies degrees.

L290 Topics in Labor Studies (1-3 cr.)  This is a variable-title course.  L290 can be repeated for credit with different subjects.  The transcript will show a different subtitle each time the course is taken.  Some courses focus on contemporary or special areas of labor studies.  Others are directed toward specific categories of employees and labor organizations. See the list below or inquire at iulabor@iupui.edu

L290 History of Women’s Participation in the Labor Movement (3 cr.) This course will explore the unique and untold experiences of women in shaping the American labor movement and the ever-changing images of women in the workforce.  By examining the words, images, and experiences of working women in several important and pivotal moments in history, this course will examine how women workers, organized and not, helped all workers gain dignity and respect for their contributions to economic security, political participation, and worker solidarity.

L290 Sexual Harassment in the Workplace (1 cr.) This one-credit course will briefly examine all aspects of workplace and academic sexual harassment, including but not limited to definitions, history, federal and state law, EEOC guidelines and procedures, employer and school liability, personnel, school and contract language and policies, and personal perspectives.  Reasons for and solutions to workplace and academic sexual harassment will be discussed.

L290 Preventing Workplace Violence (1 cr.) This course will examine the causes, preventions, and individual risks for workers from the real/perceived threat of violence in the workplace.  We will identify behavioral, environmental, and administrative factors that contribute or prevent the incidents of violence in the workplace.

L290 Family Medical Leave Act (1 cr.) This class will examine the 1993 Family Medical Leave Act law that has given employees new rights to request leave from their employer.  We will review the history of the passage of the FMLA and will examine maternity leave, parental leave, sick leave, and protections for disabled workers in US and other countries.

L290 Strikes: Labor Revolt in America (1 cr.) Most people in society face a common problem: they must work for someone else to make a living. The best hours of their lives are spent in meeting their employers’ requirements. The results of their labors may sometimes correspond to their own social needs—but their work is just as likely to destroy their own social and natural environment, make their work-time still more onerous, and increase their subordination. This creates continuous conflict between workers, on the one hand, and employers and those who support them, on the other. At times over the course of U.S. history, that struggle has resulted in visible, violent, and dramatic labor strikes. This course looks at a few of those strikes of ordinary American working people during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine the events in historical context, analyze how they have been remembered in poetry, painting, and song, and connect their meaning to more current movements for economic and cultural justice.    

 L290 Framed: Labor and the Media (1 cr.) This course examines media (and, in turn, public) understanding of the U.S. labor movement and analyzes reaction to some specific, highly publicized strikes. News media have rarely served as independent storytellers of strikes. Instead they have told stories that are aligned with the generally antilabor interests of corporate America (including their publishers and parent media corporations). Even among more liberal media, “ordinary” workers are often portrayed as a passive mass that is controlled and directed by unions and labor leaders. It is rare to see any news outlet sympathetic to the beliefs and causes of labor or to striking workers. This course will be driven by the overarching question of why that might be.

L290 How TV Frames the Working Class (1 cr.) How TV Frames the Working Class explores television’s portrayal of working class people, from the early images of the late 1940’s to those on display in recent situational comedies, dramas, and “reality” programs.

L290 Images of Labor on Film (3 cr.) This course provides fascinating insights into the construction of images of labor through films and other media.  It examines concepts of class, working people, and historical periods of labor transformation through feature films and documentaries depicting workers, culture, the working class, their struggles, and mobilization. Hollywood’s representation of labor and the portraits available from alternative media are analyzed.

L290 Latinos, Labor, and Migration in the United States (3 cr.) The course will explore the most pressing social problems faced by Latinos, as well as current political debates and hot-button issues that frame the dialogue and encounters between Latino and non-Latino populations in the U.S. Examination of statistical analyses and data sets from sources like the United States Census Bureau, the Department of Labor, and the Pew Research Foundation will allow students to evaluate general patterns and trends in Latino communities of the U.S. Exploration of workplace and community case studies will provide more specific information at the local, grass-roots level.

L290 Latin American Issues in a Global Society (3 cr.) This course is designed for students interested in international issues, particularly in Latin America. Recent experiences in Latin America figure prominently in the current global society and they offer a rich and diverse response to neoliberal globalization by expanding the basis for economic and political equality, social justice, as well as building alternatives to longstanding issues of poverty and colonialism  as well as authoritarian political practices. The responses to globalization in the southern continent are not the result of a monolithic process, but rather an expansive struggle for political, economic and social justice, involving millions of people over a long period of time.

L299 Self-Acquired Competency in Labor Studies (1-15 cr.) See this bulletin for a description of Self-Acquired Competency.

Advanced Courses

L314 Ethical Dilemmas in the Workplace (3cr.) This courses explores the ethical decision-making and behavior in a unionized workplace, based on the values and social justice mission of unions. Students will examine what constitutes ethical standards on issues such as affirmative action, transparency, membership involvement, and democratic procedures. This includes the philosophical and theoretical bases for ethics and discussions on the relationship between law and ethics in dealing with workplace conflict.

L315 The Organization of Work (3 cr.) This course examines how work is organized and how jobs are evaluated, measured, and controlled.  It explores social and technical elements of work through theories of scientific management, the human relations school of management, and contemporary labor process literature.

L320 Grievance Arbitration (3 cr.) (Recommended only after L220 or with permission of instructor.)  This course explores the legal and practical context of grievance arbitration, and its limitations and advantages in resolving workplace problems. Varieties of arbitration clauses and the status of awards are also explored.  Students analyze research, prepare, and present cases in mock arbitration hearings.

L330 Global Comparisons: Labor Relations Examples from Three Continents (3 cr.)
This course uses a political economy framework to explore and compare countries’ systems of labor relations, drawing from at least three continents.  It analyzes the diverse approaches to the structure of twenty-first century labor law and social policy.  It focuses on the role of organized labor in the global economy, patterns of breakdown in the enforcement of labor and employment law, and union and nonunion political and bargaining responses.

L331 Global Problems, Local Solutions (3 cr.) This course addresses local manifestations of global problems confronting society, workers, and the labor movement. Students will cooperatively analyze issues, propose potential solutions, and engage in activities or practices that address globally driven local issues. Students will identify governmental, non-governmental, and charitable organizations that aid in ameliorating local problems. As a final project, students will design collaborative solutions based on our contemporary global situation in which work is characterized by flexibility, insecurity, and geographic mobility. 

L350 Issues in Collective Bargaining (3 cr.)  This course focuses on selected topics in collective bargaining and will include readings and discussions on workplace issues that may be remedied through the collective bargaining process. A research paper is usually required.

L360 Union Administration and Development (1-3 cr.) This course covers practical and theoretical perspectives on strategic planning, budgeting, and organizational decision making.  It addresses the needs and problems of union leaders by studying organizational change, staff development, and cohesiveness within a diverse workforce.  This course may be repeated for up to 3 credits with department approval.

L370 Labor and Religion (3cr.) This course examines the relationship between religion and the labor movement as it has developed in the United States over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will analyze the approach taken by religious institutions concerning workers’ issues and assess the tradition in which workers of faith connect to more secular concerns for social and economic justice.

L380 Theories of the Labor Movement (3 cr.) This course examines various perspectives on the origin, development, and goals of organized labor.  Theories include those that view the labor movement as a business union institution, an agent for social reform, a revolutionary force, a psychological reaction to industrialization, a moral force, and an unnecessary intrusion.

L385 Class, Race, Gender, and Work (3 cr.) This course provides a historical overview of the impact and interplay of class, race, and gender on shaping U.S. labor markets, organizations, and policies.  It examines union responses and strategies for addressing class, race, and gender issues.

 L390 Topics in Labor Studies (3 cr.)  This is a variable-title course.  L390 can be repeated for credit with different subjects.  The transcript will show a different subtitle each time the course is taken.  Some courses focus on contemporary or special areas of labor studies.  Others are directed toward specific categories of employees and labor organizations. See the list below or inquire at iulabor@iupui.edu

L390 The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) (3 cr.) The Industrial Workers of the World represented an alternative to the conservative and legalistic tradition in US trade unions. Organized in 1905, it spearheaded labor organization among workers left out of the craft-unionist American Federation of Labor. This course is an upper-level seminar which will examine the history of the IWW as a facet of labor history and the history of radical social movements in the United States.

L390 Latinos, Labor, and Migration in the United States (3 cr.)
The course will explore the most pressing social problems faced by Latinos, as well as current political debates and hot-button issues that frame the dialogue and encounter between Latino and non-Latino populations in the U.S. Examination of statistical analyses and data sets from sources like the United States Census Bureau, the Department of Labor, and the Pew Research Foundation will allow students to evaluate general patterns and trends in Latino communities of the U.S. Exploration of workplace and community case studies will provide more specific information at the local, grass-roots level.

L 390 Images of Labor on Film (3 cr.) This course provides fascinating insights into the construction of images of labor through films and other media.  It examines concepts of class, working people, and historical periods of labor transformation through feature films and documentaries depicting workers, culture, the working class, their struggles, and mobilization. Hollywood’s representation of labor and the portraits available from alternative media are analyzed.

L390 Women and Development (3 cr.) This online course provides an overview of the field of women/gender and development in low-income nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America and will cover the main debates in this field, including the ways in which gender relations within households and communities affect women's employment and working conditions; the differential impact of globalization on women and men in agriculture, the informal sector, and the formal labor force; health issues, population control, climate change, and migration as seen through a gender lens; and effects of global financial crises on women. 

L390 Bringing Human Rights Home to Indiana (3 cr.) This course engages all participants to gain a working knowledge and basic understanding of the meaning of human rights and human rights movement(s) in Indiana. We shall examine historic human rights movements in the United States; specific human rights documents that are pertinent to working-class life in our region; and we shall begin to consider the difference human rights can make in our various workplaces and communities within our region.

L390 Latin American Issues in a Global Society (3 cr.) This course is designed for students interested in international issues, particularly in Latin America. Recent experiences in Latin America figure prominently in the current global society and they offer a rich and diverse response to neoliberal globalization by expanding the basis for economic and political equality, social justice, as well as building alternatives to longstanding issues of poverty and colonialism  as well as authoritarian political practices. The responses to globalization in the southern continent are not the result of a monolithic process, but rather an expansive struggle for political, economic and social justice, involving millions of people over a long period of time.

L390 Auto Industry in Transition (3 cr.) Of all 20th century industries, it was the auto sector that best captured the sway of capitalism and the rise of American dominance  As late as the first year of the 21st century, Fortune ranked GM as the largest (by revenue) of all global corporations. The fruits of the assembly line did not, of course, flow automatically to those tied to it. That only came as workers organized to challenge auto industry unilateral power (Gindin, 2009). This course will examine the question posed by the humbling of the American auto industry in the current economic crisis, namely, whether this represented a failure specific to the U.S. auto industry, or speaks to the decline of U.S. manufacturing more generally and with it, American economic power. But a more important issue – because it is central to the challenging of U.S. power both at home and abroad – is the extent to which the most recent losses imposed on the auto unions reflect a momentous defeat of the broader working class in both the U.S. and Canada.

L390 Labor Journalism (3 cr.) If you are writing for the labor movement at any level, you will get the help you need to be more effective. Regardless of where your writing ends up -- flyers, newspapers, magazines, blog postings, and other outlets -- you will get not only tips and techniques, but a solid grounding on the principles of labor journalism. "Labor journalism" isn't really different from the journalism we encounter every day; it's just that you have a much better idea of your reading audience. Be prepared to show past writing samples, and to write, write, and write some more.

L390 Labor and Global Warming (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to global climate disruption from the perspective of how it affects workers and jobs. In this course we will  discuss the major elements of global climate disruption, learn about globalization and the international response to global warming, give examples of how labor has responded to this issue and identify major organizations active in the labor movement on the issue, learn about the role of politics and economics (a knowledge of economics is not required), learn about  what environmental justice means and how it relates to labor and global climate disruption, and look at examples of solutions to global climate disruption.  

L390 Strikes: Labor Revolt in America (1 cr.) Most people in society face a common problem: they must work for someone else to make a living. The best hours of their lives are spent in meeting their employers’ requirements. The results of their labors may sometimes correspond to their own social needs—but their work is just as likely to destroy their own social and natural environment, make their work-time still more onerous, and increase their subordination. This creates continuous conflict between workers, on the one hand, and employers and those who support them, on the other. At times over the course of U.S. history, that struggle has resulted in visible, violent, and dramatic labor strikes. This course looks at a few of those strikes of ordinary American working people during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine the events in historical context, analyze how they have been remembered in poetry, painting, and song, and connect their meaning to more current movements for economic and cultural justice.    

L390 Framed: Labor and the Media (1 cr.) This course examines media (and, in turn, public) understanding of the U.S. labor movement and analyzes reaction to some specific, highly publicized strikes. News media have rarely served as independent storytellers of strikes. Instead they have told stories that are aligned with the generally antilabor interests of corporate America (including their publishers and parent media corporations). Even among more liberal media, “ordinary” workers are often portrayed as a passive mass that is controlled and directed by unions and labor leaders. It is rare to see any news outlet sympathetic to the beliefs and causes of labor or to striking workers. This course will be driven by the overarching question of why that might be.

L390 Staffing as a Safety Issue (3 cr.) Staffing as a Safety Issue will explore the theory and practice of workforce staffing in health care considering the impact of health care management decisions related to staffing on quality of care for patients and occupational health for workers.  Theoretical perspectives, research, union contracts and definitional constructs will be examined and discussed.  Participants will work in individually and in pairs to research and explore health care staffing in specific segments of the health care industry and propose an action research project as a synthesis of their learning.

L410 Comparative Labor Movements (3 cr.)  This course helps uses historical, analytical, and comparative perspectives to examine labor movements and labor relations in industrial societies.  It also emphases interactions between unions and political organizations, national labor policies, the resolution of workplace problems, the organization of white collar employees, and the issues of worker control and codetermination.

L420 Labor Studies Internship (1-6 cr.)  This course applies classroom knowledge in the field.  L420 may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

L430 Labor Research Methods (3 cr.)  This course focuses on the study of research design, methods, techniques, and procedures applicable to research problems in labor studies.

L480 Senior Seminar or Readings (3 cr.)  This course can be used as a classroom seminar or directed reading course.  It addresses current issues, historical developments, and other labor-related concerns.  Topics may vary each semester.

L490 Topics in Labor Studies (1-3 cr.)  This is a variable-title course.  L490 can be repeated for credit with different subjects. The transcript will show a different subtitle each time the course is taken.  Some courses focus on contemporary or special areas of labor studies.  Others are directed toward specific categories of employees and labor organizations. Inquire at Labor Studies offices.

L495 Directed Labor Study (1-6 cr.) This is a variable credit course.  L495 may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Students arrange to study with an individual labor studies faculty member, designing a course of study to suit their individual and varied needs and interests.  The contract might include reading, directed application of prior course work, tutorials, or internships.  Competencies are assessed through written papers, projects, reports, or interviews.